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Wingard Coat of Arms / Wingard Family Crest

Wingard Coat of Arms / Wingard Family Crest

This surname of WINGARD is an English occupational name for someone who lived and worked in a vineyard. The name was derived from the elements WIN (wine) + GEARD (yard, enclosure). Other spellings of the name include WINYARD, WYNYARD, WUNNARD and WYNGARD. During the Middle Ages the manufacture and fermenting of wines and ale was necessary in every small village. Ale was the people's food in liquid form, and was consumed by everybody at all times. The extreme poverty of the Franciscans when they first settled in London was noted by a writer at the time 'I have seen the brothers drink ale so sour that some would have preferred to drink water'. In early times each villager usually brewed his own drink although he often had to pay the lord of the manor for the privilege of using his equipment. In later times the manufacture of ales and wine became an important monastic industry. The earliest of the name on record appears to be Sarra de WINIARD, who was recorded in 1212 in County Berkshire, and Juliana de la WINGARDE, was documented in Somerset in the year 1327. Surnames derived from placenames are divided into two broad categories; topographic names and habitation names. Topographic names are derived from general descriptive references to someone who lived near a physical feature such as an oak tree, a hill, a stream or a church. Habitation names are derived from pre-existing names denoting towns, villages and farmsteads. Other classes of local names include those derived from the names of rivers, individual houses with signs on them, regions and whole countries. Later instances of the name include Edwin de WINYARD of Yorkshire, who was listed in the Yorkshire Poll Tax of 1379. In the Middle Ages heraldry came into use as a practical matter. It originated in the devices used to distinguish the armoured warriors in tournament and war, and was also placed on seals as marks of identity. As far as records show, true heraldry began in the middle of the 12th century, and appeared almost simultaneously in several countries of Western Europe. The lion depicted in the arms is the noblest of all wild beasts which is made to be the emblem of strength and valour, and is on that account the most frequently borne in Coat-Armour.


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Last Updated: Dec. 1st, 2021

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