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Waghorn Coat of Arms / Waghorn Family Crest

Waghorn Coat of Arms / Waghorn Family Crest

The surname of WAGHORN was an occupational name 'the hornblower or one who played the trumpet'. Originally the coat of arms identified the wearer, either in battle or in tournaments. Completely covered in body and facial armour the knight could be spotted and known by the insignia painted on his shield, and embroidered on his surcoat, the draped garment which enveloped him. This west country surname was taken to Scotland early by settlers and Finlaw Waghorne was declared innocent of part in the detention of King James III in Edinburgh Castle in 1482. Michael Waghorne was a charter witness in Glasgow and David Waghorne was the owner of land in Glasgow in 1551. Between the 11th and 15th centuries it became customary for surnames to be assumed in Europe, but were not commonplace in England or Scotland before the Norman Conquest of 1066. They are to be found in the Domesday Book of 1086. Those of gentler blood assumed surnames at this time, but it was not until the reign of Edward II (1307-1327) that second names became general practice for all people. Other records of the name mention John Waghorne, during the reign of Richard II (1377-1399). William Lane married Mary Waghorne at St. Michael, Cornhill, London in the year 1736. Daniel Waghorn married Mercy Wait at St. George's, Hanover Square, London in 1795. The name is also spelt Waghorne. Occupational surnames originally denoted the actual occupation followed by the individual. At what period they became hereditary is a difficult problem. Many of the occupation names were descriptive and could be varied. In the Middle Ages, at least among the Christian population, people did not usually pursue specialized occupations exclusively to the extent that we do today, and they would, in fact, turn their hand to any form of work that needed to be done, particularly in a large house or mansion, or on farms and smallholdings. In early documents, surnames often refer to the actual holder of an office, whether the church or state. Over the centuries, most people in Europe have accepted their surname as a fact of life, as irrevocable as an act of God. However much the individual may have liked or disliked the surname, they were stuck with it, and people rarely changed them by personal choice. A more common form of variation was in fact involuntary, when an official change was made, in other words, a clerical error.


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Last Updated: Dec. 1st, 2021

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