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Treacher Coat of Arms / Treacher Family Crest

Treacher Coat of Arms / Treacher Family Crest

This surname of TREACHER was derived from the Old French word Trechor - a nickname given to a trickster, one who played jokes. The earliest French hereditary surnames are found in the 12th century, at more or less the same time as they arose in England, but they are by no means common before the 13th century, and it was not until the 15th century that they stabilized to any great extent; before then a surname might be handed down for two or three generations, but then abandoned in favour of another. In the south, many French surnames have come in from Italy over the centuries, and in Northern France, Germanic influence can often be detected.The name was brought to England in the wake of the Norman Conqueror in 1066. Surnames having a derivation from nicknames form the broadest and most miscellaneous class of surnames, encompassing many different types of origin. The most typical classes refer adjectivally to the general physical aspect of the person concerned, or to his character. Many nicknames refer to a man's size or height, while others make reference to a favoured article of clothing or style of dress. Many surnames derived from the names of animals and birds. In the Middle Ages ideas were held about the characters of other living creatures, based on observation, and these associations were reflected and reinforced by large bodies of folk tales featuring animals behaving as humans. Early records of the name mention Ralph Tricher, 1130 County Middlesex. Robert Triker was documented in the year 1198 in County Buckinghamshire. Walter ke Trichur appears in 1243 in County Somerset. A later instance mentions Jonanthan Treacher, who married Mary Williamson at St. Michael, Cornhill, London in 1706. Originally the coat of arms identified the wearer, either in battle or in tournaments. Completely covered in body and facial armour the knight could be spotted and known by the insignia painted on his shield, and embroidered on his surcoat, the draped garment which enveloped him. Between the 11th and 15th centuries it became customary for surnames to be assumed in Europe, but were not commonplace in England or Scotland before the Norman Conquest of 1066. They are to be found in the Domesday Book of 1086. Those of gentler blood assumed surnames at this time, but it was not until the reign of Edward II (1307-1327) that second names became general practice for all people.


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Last Updated: Dec. 1st, 2021

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