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Traylor Coat of Arms / Traylor Family Crest

Traylor Coat of Arms / Traylor Family Crest

This surname TRAYLOR is of French and Cornish origin. In France the name was a topographic name for someone who lived near a vineyard, or in a house with an ornamental vine. The name was derived from the Old French word TREILLE, a lattice used to support vines, and was rendered in medieval documents in the Latin form TRICHILA (arbour, bower). Other spellings of the name include TREILLE, TREILLES, TRILLE, LATREILLE, TRIAS, TREILLET and TRILLAT. The name was brought into Cornwall at an early date and records of the name mention Richard TREWLOVE, who was recorded in County Cornwall in 1273 and Ricardus TREWLUF was documented in the year 1379. Rowland TREWLOAR appears in County Cornwall in 1597. Originally the coat of arms identified the wearer, either in battle or in tournaments. Completely covered in body and facial armour the knight could be spotted and known by the insignia painted on his shield, and embroidered on his surcoat, the draped garment which enveloped him. Between the 11th and 15th centuries it became customary for surnames to be assumed in Europe, but were not commonplace in England or Scotland before the Norman Conquest of 1066. They are to be found in the Domesday Book of 1086. Those of gentler blood assumed surnames at this time, but it was not until the reign of Edward II (1307-1327) that second names became general practice for all people. Cornish naming practices are unfortunately poorly documented for the Middle Ages, but present day Cornish surnames, somewhat surprisingly, do not follow the predominantly patronymic pattern of the other Celtic languages, including Welsh. This may be attributed to the greater influence of the English bureaucracy and English naming practices in Cornwall than in Wales at the time when surnames came into use. The majority of Cornish names are habitation names and others are derived from medieval given names. As early as the year 1100, it was quite common for English people to give French names to their children, and the earliest instances are found among the upper classes, both the clergy and the patrician families. The Norman-French names used were generally the names most commonly used by the Normans, who had introduced them into England during the Norman Invasion of William the Conqueror in 1066.


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Last Updated: Dec. 1st, 2021

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