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Stedman Coat of Arms / Stedman Family Crest

Stedman Coat of Arms / Stedman Family Crest

The Scottish and English surname of STEDMAN was an occupational name 'the steadman' a farmer. The name was derived from the Old English STEAD (a farmhouse and offices) + MAN. Occupational surnames originally denoted the actual occupation followed by the individual. At what period they became hereditary is a difficult problem. Many of the occupation names were descriptive and could be varied. In the Middle Ages, at least among the Christian population, people did not usually pursue specialized occupations exclusively to the extent that we do today, and they would, in fact, turn their hand to any form of work that needed to be done, particularly in a large house or mansion, or on farms and smallholdings. In early documents, surnames often refer to the actual holder of an office, whether the church or state. Other spellings of the name include STEDMAN, STEEDMAN and STUIDMAN. Early records of the name mention Richard STEDEMAN, who was documented in the year 1273 in County Cambridge and Roger STEDEMAN was recorded in Huntingdonshire in the year 1275. Symon le STEDEMAN was received to the English king's peace in 1321. Johannes STEDEMAN of Yorkshire, was listed in the Yorkshire Poll Tax of 1379. Between the 11th and 15th centuries it became customary for surnames to be assumed in Europe, but they were not commonplace in England or Scotland before the Norman Invasion of 1066. Those of gentler blood assumed surnames at that time, but it was not until the reign of Edward II (1307-1377) that it became common practice for all people. Later instances of the name include Wyllyam Nevell and Jone STEEDMAN, who were married at St. Michael, Cornhill, London in the year 1553 and William STUIDMAN was in residence at Auchterderay in 1574. In the Middle Ages the Herald (old French herault) was an officer whose duty it was to proclaim war or peace, carry challenges to battle and messages between sovereigns; nowadays war or peace is still proclaimed by the heralds, but their chief duty as court functionaries is to superintend state ceremonies, such as coronations, installations, and to grant arms. In the Middle Ages the Herald (old French herault) was an officer whose duty it was to proclaim war or peace, carry challenges to battle and messages between sovereigns; nowadays war or peace is still proclaimed by the heralds, but their chief duty as court functionaries is to superintend state ceremonies, such as coronations, installations, and to grant arms.


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Last Updated: Dec. 1st, 2021

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