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Maley Coat of Arms / Maley Family Crest

Maley Coat of Arms / Maley Family Crest

The surname of MALEY was a locational name 'of de Malore' a surname from Normandy, which was brought to England in the wake of the Norman Conquest of 1066. The earliest French hereditary surnames are found in the 12th century, at more or less the same time as they arose in England, but they are by no means common before the 13th century, and it was not until the 15th century that they stabilized to any great extent; before then a surname might be handed down for two or three generations, but then abandoned in favour of another. In the south, many French surnames have come in from Italy over the centuries, and in Northern France, Germanic influence can often be detected. Early records of the name mention Anketil de Malore, County Berkshire, documented in the reign of Edward III (1327-1377). Crispiane Malure was recorded in Leicester in the same year. Johannes Malore of Yorkshire, was listed in the Yorkshire Poll Tax of 1379 as was Alicia filius Maulore. William Cotton and Elizabeth Mallare were married at St. Dionis Backchurch, London in the year 1578. Mary, daughter of Stephen Malary was baptised at St. James's, Clerkenwell, London in the year 1726. A locational name usually denoted where a man held his land, and indicated where he actually lived. The original bearer would take his name from the village, town or the area where he dwelt. This name would identify his whole family, and would follow them wherever they moved Following the Crusades in Europe a need was felt for a family name. This was recognized by those of noble blood, who realised the prestige and practical advantage that it would add to their status. As early as the year 1100, it was quite common for English people to give French names to their children, and the earliest instances are found among the upper classes, both the clergy and the patrician families. The Norman-French names used were generally the names most commonly used by the Normans, who had introduced them into England during the Norman Invasion of William the Conqueror in 1066. The lion depicted in the arms is the noblest of all wild beasts which is made to be the emblem of strength and valour, and is on that account the most frequently borne in Coat-Armour.


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Last Updated: Dec. 1st, 2021

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