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Hoek Coat of Arms / Hoek Family Crest

Hoek Coat of Arms / Hoek Family Crest

The surname HOEK is a Dutch surname of two-fold origin. It was a locational name 'the dweller at the hut or small cottage'. In Bavaria it was used as an occupational name for a carpenter (ie. a builder of huts). It is also used of a maker of hats or a nickname for a wearer of distinctive hats. The original old German was HUOTAN, meaning 'to protect' and since hats were regarded in medieval times as being primarily for protection rather than for ornamentation, this is how the nickname may have been derived. The Dutch language is most closely related to Low German, and its surnames have been influenced both by German and French naming practices. The preposition 'van' is found especially with habitation names, and the 'de' mainly with nicknames. Local names usually denoted where a man held his land, and indicated where he actually lived. At first the coat of arms was a practical matter which served a function on the battlefield and in tournaments. With his helmet covering his face, and armour encasing the knight from head to foot, the only means of identification for his followers, was the insignia painted on his shield, and embroidered on his surcoat, the draped and flowing garment worn over the armour. The origin of badges and emblems, are traced to the earliest times, although, Heraldry, in fact, cannot be traced later than the 12th century, or at furthest the 11th century. At first armorial bearings were probably like surnames and assumed by each warrior at his free will and pleasure, his object being to distinguish himself from others. It has long been a matter of doubt when bearing Coats of Arms first became hereditary. It is known that in the reign of Henry V (1413-1422), a proclamation was issued, prohibiting the use of heraldic ensigns to all who could not show an original and valid right, except those 'who had borne arms at Agincourt'. The College of Arms (founded in 1483) is the Royal corporation of heralds who record proved pedigrees and grant armorial bearings. The bulk of European surnames in countries such as England and France were formed in the 13th and 14th centuries. The process started earlier and continued in some places into the 19th century, but the norm is that in the 11th century people did not have surnames, whereas by the 15th century they did.


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Last Updated: Dec. 1st, 2021

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