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Galicia Coat of Arms / Galicia Family Crest

Galicia Coat of Arms / Galicia Family Crest

The associated coat of arms for this name are recorded in J.B Rietstaps Armorial General. Illustrated by V & H.V Rolland's. This Monumental work took 23 years to complete and 85,000 coats of Arms are included in this work. The Spanish surname of GALICIA was a locational name meaning 'one who came from GALICIA' (land of the Gallaici) a medieval kingdom in north west Spain, now in La Coruna, Pontevedra, Lugo and Orense. It was colonized by the Visigoths from the 6th century; it became a subkingdom of Castile in the late 11th century. It retained its own flourishing language and culture. It is also a province in eastern Europe, which became an independent principality in 1087 until conquered by the Mongols in the 13th century. Later part of Poland (14th century) and Austria (18th century) GALICIA was divided between Poland and Austria after World War I and Poland and the Soviet Union after World War II. In the 8th century, Spain fell under the control of the Moors, and this influence, which lasted into the 12th century, has also left its mark on Hispanic surnames. A few names are based directly on Arabic personal names. The majority of Spanish occupational and nickname surnames, however, are based on ordinary Spanish derivatives. In Spain identifying patronymics are to be found as early as the mid-9th century, but these changed with each generation, and hereditary surnames seem to have come in slightly later in Spain than in England and France. As well as the names of the traditional major saints of the Christian Church, many of the most common Spanish surnames are derived from personal names of Germanic origin. For the most part these names are characteristically Hispanic. They derive from the language of the Visigoths, who controlled Spain between the mid-5th and early 8th centuries. In the Middle Ages the Herald (old French herault) was an officer whose duty it was to proclaim war or peace, carry challenges to battle and messages between sovereigns; nowadays war or peace is still proclaimed by the heralds, but their chief duty as court functionaries is to superintend state ceremonies, such as coronations, installations, and to grant arms. Edward III (1327-1377) appointed two heraldic kings-at-arms for south and north, England in 1340. The English College of Heralds was incorporated by Richard III in 1483-84.


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Last Updated: Dec. 1st, 2021

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