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Futrell Coat of Arms / Futrell Family Crest

Futrell Coat of Arms / Futrell Family Crest

This surname of FUTRELL was derived from the Middle English VEUTERE - an occupational name, a 'keeper of hounds, one who manages them in the chase'. A name familiar to County Shropshire. Many of the modern family names throughout Europe reflect the profession or occupation of their forbears in the Middle Ages and derive from the position held by their ancestors in the village, noble household or religious community in which they lived and worked. The addition of their profession to their birth name made it easier to identify individual tradesmen and craftsmen. As generations passed and families moved around, so the original identifying names developed into the corrupted but simpler versions that we recognise today. The name is also spelt FEUTERER, FEWTRER, FETTER, FEWTERER, FEWTER, VEWTER and VAUTIER. The earliest of the name on record appears to be Walter le FEUTERER of the County of Hampshire who was documented in the year 1273. The small villages of Europe, or royal and noble households, even large religious dwellings and monasteries, gave rise to many family names, which reflected the occupation or profession of the original bearer of the name. Following the Crusades in Europe in the 11th 12th and 13th centuries a need was felt for an additional name. This was recognized by those of gentle birth, who realised that it added prestige and practical advantage to their status. Later instances of the name mention Fulcher le FEWTRER, who was recorded in County Norfolk in 1474, and Mark Barrington and Elizabeth FETTER were married in Canterbury in the year 1667, Robert, son of Jonathan VAUTIER, was baptised at St. Peter, Cornhill, London in 1731. In the Middle Ages the Herald (old French herault) was an officer whose duty it was to proclaim war or peace, carry challenges to battle and messages between sovereigns; nowadays war or peace is still proclaimed by the heralds, but their chief duty as court functionaries is to superintend state ceremonies, such as coronations, installations, and to grant arms. Edward III (1327-1377) appointed two heraldic kings-at-arms for south and north, England in 1340. The English College of Heralds was incorporated by Richard III in 1483-84.


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Last Updated: Dec. 1st, 2021

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