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Frueh Coat of Arms / Frueh Family Crest

Frueh Coat of Arms / Frueh Family Crest

This German surname of FRUEH was a nickname applied to one in the habit of rising early in the morning. It was also a name applied to one 'born out of wedlock'. Our ancestors had no qualms against labelling a man illegitimate, and in England the name Bastard was still in use in the 17th century. In France the name can still be found. Americans, by exercising their tendency to ridicule have completely eliminated the name in the United States, and have changed the name to FRUEH (or FRUEHAFF). The German omomastic authorities soften the meaning somewhat to give the connotation of a child born before marriage. In many places marriage legitimizes children who had been born earlier. Surnames having a derivation from nicknames form the broadest and most miscellaneous class of surnames, encompassing many different types of origin. The most typical classes refer adjectivally to the general physical aspect of the person concerned, or to his character. Many nicknames refer to a man's size or height, while others make reference to a favoured article of clothing or style of dress. Many surnames derived from the names of animals and birds. In the Middle Ages ideas were held about the characters of other living creatures, based on observation, and these associations were reflected and reinforced by large bodies of folk tales featuring animals behaving as humans. The first hereditary surnames on German soil are found in the second half of the 12th century, slightly later than in England and France. However, it was not until the 16th century that they became stabilized. The practice of adopting hereditary surnames began in the southern areas of Germany, and gradually spread northwards during the Middle Ages. The word Heraldry is derived from the German HEER, (a host, an army) and HELD, (champion): the term BLASON, by which the science is denoted in French, English, Italian and German, has most probably its origin in the German word 'BLAZEN' (to blow the horn). Whenever a new knight appeared at a Tournament, the herald sounded the trumpet, and as competitors attended with closed vizors, it was his duty to explain the bearing of the shield or coat-armour belonging to each. Thus, the knowledge of the various devices and symbols was called 'Heraldry'. The Germans transmitted the word to the French, and it reached England after the Norman Conquest of 1066.


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Last Updated: Dec. 1st, 2021

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