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Emmerson Coat of Arms / Emmerson Family Crest

Emmerson Coat of Arms / Emmerson Family Crest

This surname EMMERSON was a baptismal name 'the son of Amory' a font name that lingered on until the end of the eighteenth century. The name was originally derived from the Old French 'amauri' meaning 'work-rule' and was brought into England in the wake of the Norman Invasion of 1066. The earliest of the name on record appears to be AMALRICUS (without surname) who was recorded in the Domesday Book of 1086. Many of the early names recorded in medieval documents denote noble families but many also indicate migration from the continent during, and in the wake of, the Norman invasion of 1066. There was a constant stream of merchants, workmen and others arriving in England during this time. In 1086 the Record of Great Inquisition of lands of England, their extent, value, ownership and liabilities was made by order of William The Conqueror. It is known as the Domesday Book. Other records of the name mention Ymerus filius Raineri, 1160 in London, and Robertus filius Amalrici appears in Warwickshire in 1297. Later instances of the name include William Emmerson and Mary Newce, who were married in London in the year 1529. Emerye Tilney and Elizabeth Hart, who married at St. Mary, Aldermary, London in 1602. Edmund Baker married Easter Emerye at St. James's, Clerkenwell, London in 1669. As early as the year 1100, it was quite common for English people to give French names to their children, and the earliest instances are found among the upper classes, both the clergy and the patrician families. The Norman-French names used were generally the names most commonly used by the Normans, who had introduced them into England during the Norman Invasion of William the Conqueror in 1066. It has long been a matter of doubt when the bearing of coats of arms first became hereditary and it was not until the Crusades that Heraldry came into general use. Men went into battle heavily armed and were difficult to recognise. It became the custom for them to adorn their helmets with distinctive crests, and to paint their shields with animals and the like. Coats of arms accompanied the development of surnames, becoming hereditary in the same way. The associated arms are recorded in Sir Bernard Burkes General Armory. Ulster King of Arms in 1884. The lion is the noblest of all wild beasts which is made to be the emblem of strength and valour, and is on that account the most frequently borne in Coat-Armour.


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Last Updated: Dec. 1st, 2021

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