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Wertz Coat of Arms / Wertz Family Crest

Wertz Coat of Arms / Wertz Family Crest

This originally Norman surname of WERTZ was derived from a Germanic personal name composed of the elements WARIN (guard) and HERI (meaning army). The name was introduced into England during the wake of the Norman invasion of 1066. The name has been anglicized to Warner. The name has two distinct origins, it was a baptismal name 'the son of Warrener' and an occupational name meaning the keeper of the 'warren' a place privileged for the keeping of conies, hares, partridges and pheasants. Surnames are divided into four categories, from occupations, nicknames, baptismal and locational. All the main types of these are found in German-speaking areas, and names derived from occupations and from nicknames are particularly common. A number of these are Jewish. Patronymic surnames are derived from vernacular Germanic given names, often honouring Christian saints. Regional and ethnic names are also common. The German preposition 'von (from) or 'of', used with habitation names, is taken as a mark of aristocracy, and usually denoted proprietorship of the village or estate from where they came. Some members of the nobility affected the form VON UND ZU with their titles. In eastern Germany there was a heavy influence both from and on neighbouring Slavonic languages. Many Prussian surnames are of Slavonic origin. The name is also spelt WERNELEIN, WEHRLE, WORNZ, WERTZ, WORNER, WARNER and WORNHOR. An early record of the name includes a Dr. P.W. WERTZ of Long Swamp, University, Pennsylvania, who taught medicine there circa. 1885. German or Teutonic heraldry extended its sphere of influence over central Europe and spread into Scandinavia. It is most notable for its design and treatment of crests, most of which reflect the arms in the charge or tinctures (colours) or both, which is unknown in British heraldry. Teutonic Europe assembled many arms on a single shield, each bearing its corresponding crest on a helmet. The Rose depicted in the arms is used as a distinction for the seventh son. The Distinction of Houses are used to distinguish the younger from the elder branches of a family, and to show from which line each is descended.


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last updated on: September 13 2018

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