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Poupard Coat of Arms / Poupard Family Crest

This French surname of POUPARD is of two-fold origin. It was a nickname for one with the characteristics of a baby or a small child. It was also a name which was applied to a man of the cloth, from the Old French PAPE (pope). The name is also spelt PAPART, PAPA, PAPE and POUPERT. The male member of a religious order or monastery was an important person in Medieval Europe. It designated the members of the four mendicant orders, which became prominent in the 13th century, the Dominicans, Franciscans, Carmelites and Augustinians. They lived among their fellowmen travelling and preaching throughout the world. The villagers appreciated their courage and service and welcomed them. Some of the members were lay brothers or 'conversi' who lived according to a rule, but were not so strict as the monks or canons. They were illiterate, engaged mainly in manual work, and had their own living quarters. Jews would sometimes convert to Christianity and in 1154 there was a school in Bristol, England for converts. During the 13th century King Henry III founded the House of Converts in Chancery lane, London, as a home for Jews who had abandoned their faith. The name was brought into England in the wake of the Norman Invasion of 1066 and early records of the name include Blachemannus PAPE, who was recorded in County Suffolk in the year 1095, and Adam le PAPE was documented in Berkshire in 1178. Later instances of the name include Robertus PAPE of Yorkshire, who was listed in the Yorkshire Poll Tax of 1379. David James and Betty PAPE were married at St. George's, Hanover Square, London in 1785. As early as the year 1100, it was quite common for English people to give French names to their children, and the earliest instances are found among the upper classes, both the clergy and the patrician families. The Norman-French names used were generally the names most commonly used by the Normans, who had introduced them into England during the Norman Invasion of William the Conqueror in 1066. As early as the year 1100, it was quite common for English people to give French names to their children, and the earliest instances are found among the upper classes, both the clergy and the patrician families. The Norman-French names used were generally the names most commonly used by the Normans, who had introduced them into England during the Norman Invasion of William the Conqueror in 1066.

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last updated on: September 13 2018

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