Macindeor Coat of Arms / Macindeor Family Crest

This Scottish surname of MACINDEOR was in Gaelic MACINDEOIR, meaning 'the son of Dewar'. They were formerly a sept in Glassrie, and now in Lochow. Their ancestor went to Argyllshire during the reign of James III (1451-88). Early records of the name include Colin MACINDOYR, who was a juror on an inquisition on the lands of Inchesturphyn in the 13th century. Gillaspy McINDEWIR was a tenant of Ardtalloch, Islay in 1541, and a servant of Allaster Moit M'INDEIR has to answer to a charge of violence and robbery in 1592. The first people in Scotland to acquire fixed surnames were the nobles and great landowners, who called themselves, or were called by others, after the lands they possessed. Surnames originating in this way are known as territorial. Formerly lords of baronies and regalities and farmers were inclined to magnify their importance and to sign letters and documents with the names of their baronies and farms instead of their Christian names and surnames. The abuse of this style of speech and writing was carried so far that an Act was passed in the Scots parliament in 1672 forbidding the practice and declaring that it was allowed only to noblemen and bishops to subscribe by their titles. Sir H.J. MACKINDER was the author of 'Britain and the British Seas (1941). The M'INDEORS or Dewars of Islay often call themselves Macarthurs. Hereditary surnames were originally imported from France into England during the Norman Conquest of 1066. In the two centuries or so after the Conquest surnames were acquired by most families of major landholders, and many landed families of lesser importance. There appears to have been a constant trickle of migration into Britain between about the years 1200 and 150O, mostly from France and the Low Countries, with a small number of migrants from Scandinavia, Germany, Italy and the Iberian peninsular, and occasional individuals from further afield. During this period groups of aliens settled in this country as for example, the Germans who from the late 15th century onwards settled in Cumbria to work the metal mines. Immigration during this time had only a small effect on the body of surnames used in Britain. In many cases, the surnames of immigrants were thoroughly Anglicised. The late sixteenth century saw the arrival, mostly in London and the south-coast ports of large numbers of people fleeing from was regions of France. In the middle ages heraldry came into use as a practical matter. It originated in the devices used to distinguish the armoured warriors in tournament and war, and was also placed on seals as marks of identity.

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last updated on: September 13 2018

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