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Kercher Coat of Arms / Kercher Family Crest

Kercher Coat of Arms / Kercher Family Crest

The surname of KERCHER has the associated coat of arms recorded in Sir Bernard Burkes General Armory. Ulster King of Arms in 1884. This surname was a German and Jewish nickname for a crafty and cunning person, derived from the Old German word KARAG, meaning troubled, preoccupied. The Jewish meaning of the surname was one who was mean and miserly. The name has travelled widely in many forms which include KARGER, KARGMAN, CARGOFF, KARGEL and CARLESS. Surnames having a derivation from nicknames form the broadest and most miscellaneous class of surnames, encompassing many different types of origin. The most typical classes refer adjectivally to the general physical aspect of the person concerned, or to his character. Many nicknames refer to a man's size or height, while others make reference to a favoured article of clothing or style of dress. Many surnames derived from the names of animals and birds. In the Middle Ages ideas were held about the characters of other living creatures, based on observation, and these associations were reflected and reinforced by large bodies of folk tales featuring animals behaving as humans. Early records of the name in England mention CHERCHER (without surname) who was listed as a tenant in the Domesday Book of 1086. KERICHER (without surname) was documented in County Suffolk in the year 1299. The first hereditary surnames on German soil are found in the second half of the 12th century, slightly later than in England and France. However, it was not until the 16th century that they became stabilized. The practice of adopting hereditary surnames began in the southern areas of Germany, and gradually spread northwards during the Middle Ages. Because of the close relationship between the English and German languages, some Germans are able to transform their names to the English form just by dropping a single letter. Many Germans have re-spelt their names in America. After the start of the first World War, Germans in great numbers Anglicized their names in an effort to remove all doubt as to their patriotism. Afterwards some changed back, and then during World War II the problem became acute once more, and the changing started all over again, although not with as much intensity. Many immigrants from Germany settled in Pennsylvania.


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last updated on: September 13 2018

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