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AUSTIN Family Crest / AUSTIN Coat of Arms

AUSTIN Family Crest / AUSTIN Coat of Arms

This name AUSTIN has been on record in Ireland since the early fourteenth century, an English surname, not closely identified with any particular area. The name in Irish is Mac Aibhistin. It was a baptismal name 'the son of Augustine', the name means 'majestic'. Early records of the name mention Astin de Bennington of the County of Lincoln in 1273. Henry Austin of the County of Worcestershire in 1272. Edith Austines was listed in the Yorkshire Poll Tax of 1379. The name was made common by the Austin Friars, or Black Canons, as they were called from their black cloaks, who were established during the 12th Century in England. Originally the coat of arms identified the wearer, either in battle or in tournaments. Completely covered in body and facial armour the knight could be spotted and known by the insignia painted on his shield, and embroidered on his surcoat, the draped garment which enveloped him. Between the 11th and 15th centuries it became customary for surnames to be assumed in Europe, but were not commonplace in England or Scotland before the Norman Conquest of 1066. They are to be found in the Domesday Book of 1086. Those of gentler blood assumed surnames at this time, but it was not until the reign of Edward II (1307-1327) that second names became general practice for all people. At first the coat of arms was a practical matter which served a function on the battlefield and in tournaments. With his helmet covering his face, and armour encasing the knight from head to foot, the only means of identification for his followers, was the insignia painted on his shield and embroidered on his surcoat, the draped and flowing garment worn over the armour. The associated arms are recorded in Sir Bernard Burkes General Armory. Ulster King of Arms in 1884. Before the 1066 Conquest names were rare in England, the few examples found were mainly adopted by those of the clergy or one who had taken holy orders. In 1086 the conquering Duke William of Normandy commanded the Domesday Book. He wanted to know what he had and who held it, and the Book describes Old English society under its new management in minute detail. It was then that surnames began to be taken for the purposes of tax-assessment. The nobles and the upper classes were first to realise the prestige of a second name, but it was not until the 15th century that most people had acquired a second name.


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last updated on: April 3rd, 2017

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